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Philip Giordano on I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast

In this time of strange uncertainty and worry, so many of you have been loving the bright and beautiful illustrations from I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast, so to tell you a bit more about them, we had a (socially distant) chat with their creator, Philip Giordano.

Born in a small coastal town in Liguria, Italy, to a Filipina mother and Swiss father, Philip Giordano is a tireless globetrotter, who now lives and works in Tokyo. After studying at the Brera Academy of Fine Arts and at the European Institute of Design, he earned a Master in Animation in Turin. He works for a number of magazines and publishing houses around the world, illustrating book covers, designing toys, and creating children’s books and animations.
The simple and colorful shapes of his illustrations, his iconic characters, and his graphic landscapes render his unique style immediately recognizable and transform his stories into breathtaking visual journeys. 

Flying Eye Books: The illustrations of I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast are absolutely stunning and brimming with life from all kinds of habitats. Where did you get your inspiration for the book?

Philip Giordano: When I was young, I grew up surrounded by plants. I was lucky because my home in Italy is located between the sea and the green Ligurian countryside. My mother taught me her love for gardening. I remember that inside the house we had large trunks where she planted the orchids she brought from the Philippines (her native country) and other exotic plants that she grew to feel connected to her Asian roots. It felt like being in a jungle.

As a child, I was struck by a photo of Margaret Mee (a British botanical artist specialized in plants from the rainforest and ecological activist) in one of my mum’s gardening magazines. She was suspended over the forest intent on painting the flower of a species that blooms only at night (I think it was called Moonflower).

So I started collecting plants and became a plant nerd at an early age, hoping one day to become like her: a sort of brave 19th-century explorer and discoverer of new species. And I knew for sure that I wanted to draw them!

FEB: Illustrating text written by expert ecologist and educator Michael Holland, did you learn a lot of things about the wildlife you never knew before?

PG: I already had some knowledge of the plant world, but working on “I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast” I discovered a lot of facts, especially from chapter three where Michael explains how much plants are present in and connected to our daily life. For example, when he talks about a fern from New Zealand that Māori hunters would use to find their way back home after hunting at night because the undersides of these plants’ fronds are visible. I was amazed to learn this! 

FEB: Working with educational and factual text on nature did you find it difficult to accurately illustrate plant and animal anatomy whilst making sure the children understand the processes of nature visually?

PG: The main challenge was to create scientific illustrations while maintaining my geometric, abstract, colourful and surreal style. I hope I stuck a good balance amongst all these elements.

To introduce the world of plants to children, I created a group of humanised quirky insect characters led by “Little Square”, a square-shaped fly, that appear throughout the book.

FEB: What is your creative process when working on a children’s book? How does this differ to other work you’ve been commissioned for?

PG: It’s my first non-fiction book and there is a lot of illustrated page: 114! As I’ve never done a book before dedicated exclusively to plants, it was something completely new, regarding both the non-fiction aspect as well as the amount of work to be managed in a limited time. It was a bit overwhelming, but also very exciting.

Fortunately, I got to work with an excellent team. I’d like to thank the remarkable designers for their outstanding direction as well as my dear agent for her reassurance in difficult moments.

FEB: And was there a most challenging part you found working on I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast?

PG: One of the difficult parts was managing the work in different locations. During the making of the book, I was travelling a lot for work. The storyboard part started in the Japanese countryside and ended around Taiwan and Honk Kong. Most of the final illustrations were made in my hometown in Italy.

I was fortunate in that I got ideas by directly observing the flora in the different countries I visited. Like some strange fruits eaten in Hong Kong, or tropical ferns spotted in Taiwan, or ancient pine trees in Japan. I tried to put these things into the book. (You can spot them ;) )

FEB: Your artwork is SO vibrant and bursting with energy, where do you get your colour inspiration from? And how do you create your textures?

PG: From my childhood, from all the time I spent alone in the fields watching insects and other small creatures all day long. From a book, found in Tokyo before starting the project, about fabrics and wallpapers from the fifteenth century to the present day. There are beautiful and unusual palettes. I create my textures by scanning patterns made using monotype techniques, ink brush strokes, collage out of old paper.

FEB: The animals and plants illustrated in geometric, dramatic art style have such beautiful quality. How did you develop this visual style?

PG: approached illustration because I wanted to reproduce the beauty of natural creatures, their colour and their complexity. My course in naturalistic painting (20 years ago!) gave me the basis to faithfully reproduce things with pictorial mediums. I still have the hobby of painting realistically on wooden boards.

At a certain point, however, I was fed up with representing reality, with all its shadows, shades, perfect proportions and boring rules on perspective. I needed to simplify, tidy up, see things from another point of views. This coincided with my arrival in Japan where I’ve been living for the last 9 years. In particular, I immediately fell in love with a certain essential and geometric Japanese graphic style from the 1950s (Takashi Kono) and started to observe and study them. It was a natural process. And, I was in Japan where the abstraction of forms is the basis of their aesthetics.

FEB: If forced to pick just one plant, which is your favourite of all?

PG: From the plants I draw, one of my favourites is the tulip with its bulb and roots. One of my favourite plants (a Plant that I want at home with me) is the big fern tree! I think I miss the jungle house of my childhood.

FEB: And what was your most favourite part of the book to illustrate?

PG: I had fun creating the compositions of the 4 chapters. One of my favourite pages is “Watery World”.

Thanks so much for taking the time to answer our questions Philip!

You can order a copy of I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast here and find downloadable activities to do at home here.


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My Very Own Space Activity Sheet

Trying to find your very own space during isolation might be difficult! But we’re here to help with activity sheets from the book My Very Own Space by Pippa Goodhart and Rebecca Crane. These activity sheets focus on the importance of boundaries and how personal space can be found in your own head, as well as physically!

Take a moment for yourself and think about what makes you happy, then draw the pictures in the circles :)

What’s your favourite book? If you cant pick or don’t have one yet, why not try to create your very own story!

Activity sheets available for free download here 🌼

And if you’re like the little rabbit who wants to read a book in peace, we recommend My Very Own Space by Pippa Goodhart and Rebecca Crane, available on our website. With minimal text accompanying sweet illustrations, this charming picture book explores ideas of personal space and sharing in a way that even very young children can enjoy 🐰

So remember to take some time off and find yourself the perfect space you need ✨

We are removing the delivery charge for all orders placed on www.nobrow.net but we encourage you to find out if your local bookshop is offering deliveries if you can.

Please keep an eye on our feeds as we devise a timetable of isolation activities! Stay indoors where you can, keep washing your hands and we hope that you all stay well. Lots of love from Nobrow & Flying Eye HQ.


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Me and My Fear Family Art Project

By Jessica Traylen (Infant Art Club) who is based in Central London, as tested by her two kids! Check out Jessica’s workshops at her web shop here

Welcome to the first in our #FlyingEyeArtClub series, where this week we’re styrofoam printmaking with @infant_art_club, with designs inspired by Me and My Fear by Francesca Sanna.

This is a simple, quick and effective way to make prints, using just paint and styrofoam. Sheets of styrofoam (polystyrene) can be bought from online arts and crafts suppliers, or better still – recycle! You can use the kind of foam you might find in the packaging of supermarket pizza. It’s an achievable art activity for all ages – little ones will enjoy mark making and adults can help with the printing while older children might even have a go at incorporating mirror writing into their designs.

1. You will need: styrofoam, a pencil, paint and paper.

2. Draw out your design with a pencil on the styrofoam, taking care not to press all the way through the foam.

3. Next, using either a roller or a paintbrush, spread a thin, even layer of paint onto your foam printing plate.

(Block printing ink or acrylic work best but poster paints can work too, just let the paint dry out a bit before printing!)

4. Now place your styrofoam design-side down onto your paper – apply even pressure across the back, being careful not to let the foam sheeting slip.

5. Then lift to reveal your printed picture!

 6. Ink up your foam printing plate and repeat as much as you like. You can also carefully wash your styrofoam plate to store away and reuse again another day.

Keep checking our blog for more of our #FlyingEyeArtClub series, and to see what wonderful creations you can get to working on with your little ones!


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The Fun Bundle – Leaf and The Secret of Black Rock Activity Sheets

Get creative and design your own Leaf crown and swim along with unique ocean creatures with this week’s FUN BUNDLE featuring activity sheets from Leaf by Sandra Dieckmann and The Secret of Black Rock by Joe Todd-Stanton!

Leaf Crown Activity Sheet

by Sandra Dieckmann

Our friend Leaf, the polar bear has stumbled into this beautiful vibrant forest full of big leaves and small leaves, round leaves and colourful ones! Come join Leaf and let your inner creativity loose by gathering all your materials and spending your afternoon with this fun crafting activity making your own Leaf crown 🍃👑

Leaf activity sheet available for download here. We recommend printing this in A3 so the crown fits!

The Secret of Black Rock Activity Sheet

by Joe Todd-Stanton

The Black Rock is as big as a mountain and sharp as a swordfish, but have you ever wondered what kind of creatures inhabits the deepest waters that surround it? Help Erin uncover the mysteries of the legend of the Black Rock by showing her the types of creatures that live there 🐳

The Secret of Black Rock activity sheet is available for download here

We’d love to see what you’ve been making and creating with us on social media so don’t forget to tag us in at @flyingeyebooks! If you’ve enjoyed these activity sheets, and are looking for reading materials, these books are perfect for storytime to keep the little ones engaged with a new adventure! Available in our online shop…

We are removing the delivery charge for all orders placed on www.nobrow.net but we encourage you to find out if your local bookshop is offering deliveries if you can.

Please keep an eye on our feeds as we devise a timetable of isolation activities! Stay indoors where you can, keep washing your hands and we hope that you all stay well. Lots of love from Nobrow & Flying Eye HQ.


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A Guide to Flying Eye Submissions with Senior Editor Emily Ball

Emily is our Senior Editor, and she works almost exclusively on our Flying Eye titles. She works with authors and illustrators from the commissioning stage to the moment the book is sent to print. She has a Masters in Children’s Literature from the University of Reading, and previously worked at Scholastic’s London branch. 

Take a read below to see Emily’s advice on our submissions policies, and how best to present your work when contacting a publisher.

We’re always on the hunt for new and unique stories, which is why we run our open submissions email. This allows all kinds of people, from all over the world, to reach us directly with their work. Despite spending most of my time working on current projects, I love delving into the submissions email and seeing if there are any gems hiding in there.

Although we aim to read and reply to each submission, we are a small team and do not always have time to reply to everyone! We get around 100 new submissions for children’s illustrated books every week – so sometimes I barely make a dent. However, we still want to see them coming in, as I’ve commissioned some of my favourite projects through this process. One of our upcoming titles, the beautiful Child of Galaxies, is just one of those books.  

Child of Galaxies was submitted by Blake Nuto, a primary school teacher from Tasmania who writes in his spare time. I absolutely loved his poetic and touching text, and after bringing it to our monthly acquisitions meeting we swiftly made an offer and started the hunt for the perfect illustrator. When we saw Charlotte’s art we knew her powerful yet heartfelt style was the right fit for such a moving story, and after showing her the text it seemed she thought the same – so we signed her up!

Child of Galaxies is out this May and we couldn’t be more excited. It’s a beautiful picture book about what it means to be alive and is excellent for teaching children about their place in the universe in a positive and life-affirming way. In our current situation, we feel proud to publish books like this and we sincerely hope you fall in love with it as much as we all did here. It’s a stunner. 

That’s just one of many stories from our open submissions email, which shows it is possible to get published this way! Other books we’ve received through our submissions email include the award-winning book The Journey by Francesca Sanna.

However, here’s a few top tips that might help your picture book stand out if you’re eager to send something in: 

  • Keep your submission short and sweet. If you can’t describe your book in 1-2 sentences, then it’s either too complicated for a picture book or you haven’t summed it up well enough. We flick through these emails quickly, so we want the gist of the story quickly, too.
  • Aim to attach whatever you’re submitting to the email you send. We can’t look at external links for security reasons. It also takes more time, which we often don’t have a lot of. We’re ok looking at low-res PDFs and Word documents, as we can always get in touch with you for more if we like what we see.
  • Do your research. Does your book fit our list? Every publisher is different, and we often get submissions that are great but not right for us. Research us and other publishers before submitting. You can do this by looking on ours and other publishers’ websites, browsing online at books and seeing who published them and – when this is all over – heading into bookshops to look at other children’s books that are already out there.
  • Think outside the box. As well as researching us as publishers, do some market research on your book, too. Think about whether a book like yours already exists and whether there would be room in the market for another one. What is your unique selling point? We love books that feel different and unusual, with a real story to their creation. If you think that’s you – send it over.
  • Is your artwork right for us? If you are providing text and illustration, make sure your illustration is at the high standard we expect from our illustrators. A lot of people submit thinking they NEED to provide artwork alongside their text. You don’t need to do this, as if we think the book is good, we will find the right illustrator ourselves. If you’re not someone who has studied illustration, or has a background in illustration, it’s unlikely we will go for your artwork, but we might still be open to your text.
  • Send in samples of the book, not just your artwork. Of course, if you think your art is good enough, we’d love to see it. A lot of our books are written and illustrated by the same person, so we know a lot of great illustrators are great storytellers too. Just please try to send in one or two spreads showing how you envision the book working, rather than an isolated drawing. We’re also happy to see a link to your portfolio if it backs up a submission.
  • Avoid rhyming if you can … but there are exceptions. We tend not to go for rhyming books unless the rhyme is a huge part of the story/appeal. A lot of the time we get really interesting and fun stories into the inbox, but because the rhyme feels forced, we disregard them. If you can tell your story without rhyme, do it. If it feels like it needs to rhyme, make sure it’s to a high standard.
  • Make every word count. Picture books are a collaboration of brilliant text with excellent illustration, and both do different things in a book. Try to make sure the words you’re using are really intentional and won’t just be repeated again in the illustration. We get a lot of submissions where the basic story is great, but it’s way too wordy and over-explained. Try to cut back text if you think this is you and think about what’s important to explain. In the words of the brilliant illustrator and author Judith Kerr:

“Children shouldn’t be made to read anything unnecessary. I would never put anything in the text that was in the pictures. If you say, ‘He was wearing red trousers,’ and you see a boy wearing red trousers, it’s a waste of their energy. I try to use as few words as possible, as well as possible.”

And we completely agree.

  • Be open and willing to make changes. Publishing your book with us is a collaborative process. Sometimes we will find a text we like that needs work before we can take it to our acquisitions meeting. Or if we do take it to acquisitions, we may ask you to develop it more based on feedback from that before acquiring it. Then, if we acquire the book, it’s likely we will edit it/ask you to change parts of it, to get it to be the best it can be. Therefore, we expect our artists/authors to be open to change, to listen to our feedback and to be willing to work hard to make the perfect book.
  • Keep trying and be patient. Don’t be disheartened if you don’t hear back from us, or if we reject your submission. We are a small team, with a small list, and we can’t take on every book we like or reply to every submission we get. If you don’t hear from us within 6 months, it’s likely we’ve passed on your book and haven’t been able to get back to you. If we do reply with bad news, that doesn’t mean you should give up hope. Keep trying, researching, reading and thinking – one idea might not work, but there’s plenty more where that came from and our emails are always open.

If you’d like to submit a children’s book proposal to us here at Flying Eye please find the details here.


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The Wild Fun Book!

Are you missing the outdoors? Bursting to go outside? Then come join the creator of the book Wild, Emily Hughes and the little girl who has known nothing but nature from birth.

Dive into the deepest depths of the wilderness to create your very own Wild Fun Book with the girl who has been taught to talk by birds, to eat by bears, and play by foxes. These drawing and colouring activity sheets will help you unleash your unashamedly, irrefutably, irrepressibly wild side!

These drawing sheets look like they’re missing some wildlife – let’s get imaginative and quirky to fill in what your wilderness would look like! Have you come across any strange animals in your garden/outdoors? What did they look like? And how did they talk, eat, and play?

Learn how to draw some of Emily Hughes cutest wild animals with her step by step activity sheets! Work your way up from a crow and then you’ll be going pro with the fox in no time✨

If you’ve enjoyed looking through these activity sheets, the printable download is available here!

Activity sheets brought to you from the book Wild by Emily Hughes is available to order from our website here

We are removing the delivery charge for all orders placed on www.nobrow.net but we encourage you to find out if your local bookshop is offering deliveries if you can.

Please keep an eye on our feeds as we devise a timetable of isolation activities! Stay indoors where you can, keep washing your hands and we hope that you all stay well. Lots of love from Nobrow & Flying Eye HQ.


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Free Activities Galore: From Space to the South Pole

Write some secret messages via Morse Code, put together the ideal team of explorers for your expedition to the South Pole, and discover some new and beautiful exotic birds, all from our new set of free worksheets!

Perfect for either hours of fun, a bit of distraction or the focus of a homeschool lesson, we’ve collected together some amazing activities from our books for your little learners. However of course all of our activity and colouring in sheets are suitable for all ages, getting stuck in is highly encouraged ✨

Shackleton’s Journey Activity Book

by William Grill

Take a journey across the Antarctic with the infamous explorer Ernest Shackleton, with these activity sheets from William Grill – all based on the award-winning book Shackleton’s Journey. Design your own epic adventure and recruit volunteers, whilst testing your knowledge of the South Pole as you vanquish sea monsters!

These worksheets come direct from the pages of Shackleton’s Journey Activity Book, a companion title to Shackleton’s Journey

Download the above activity sheets here.

Professor Astro Cat’s Intergalactic Activity Book

by Ben Newman & Zelda Turner

Looking at the stars, do you dream of new worlds beyond our own? Would you like to explore distant planets, fly a rocket or try some chocolate quantum physics? Good news, Professor Astro Cat is here to help!

Packed with amazing experiments, thrilling facts and create-your-own adventures, this Intergalactic Activity Book offers a universe of excitement, and is bursting with ideas for a future at the frontiers of space!

Download the above activity sheets via the link here.

Beautiful Birds Colouring In Sheets

by Emmanuelle Walker & Jean Roussen

Lose yourself in a riot of colouring in as you bring these exotic birds to life! Immerse yourself with Emmanuelle Walker’s wonderfully detailed bird illustrations. From Warblers to Blue-tits and Kakapos to Owls, colour in an alphabet of birds in their feathery fancies – perfect for all ages.

These colouring in sheets are an ideal quiet activity for a calm evening or afternoon. And if you enjoy these you can always grab a copy of either the full colouring book, or the original beautiful book its based on, from our site.

Download your own Beautiful Birds Colouring In sheets here.


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Nobrow & Flying Eye Information for Online Book Readings

Through this time of quarantine and isolation, we feel that sharing stories is now even more important than ever. We want to make this as easy as possible for everyone but we do owe it to the creators of our books to be able to let them know that it’s happening, and where possible encourage people to get hold of their books too.

In order to encourage reading and classroom read-aloud experiences, and to support schools and public libraries forced to close by the escalating COVID-19 outbreak, Nobrow and Flying Eye Books are permitting teachers, librarians and booksellers and bloggers to create and share story time and read-aloud videos and live events for families stuck at home, according to the following guidelines:

For Teachers and Educators providing distance learning to students in a virtual classroom setting:

  • Story time or classroom read-aloud videos in which a Nobrow or Flying Eye  book is read aloud and the book is displayed (for picture books) may be created and posted to closed educational platforms such as Google Classroom, Schoology, Edmodo and Discovery Education, Dojo in order to replicate the read-aloud book experience that would otherwise be available to educators in the classroom.
  • If a Teacher or Educator plans to share a story time video by recording a video, uploading it to a YouTube channel, and posting a link to that YouTube video inside a closed educational platform, that YouTube video must be designated as “Unlisted” (not “Public”) when uploading. See screenshot for how to choose “Unlisted” while uploading on YouTube.
  • These story time and classroom read-aloud videos may be hosted on the educational platform and/or YouTube (as an “Unlisted” file) until the end of the current school year, after which we request that they be removed from the educational platform and/or from YouTube, unless this permission is extended for the next school semester.

For Booksellers, Librarians & Bloggers who wish to provide a story time reading or other read-aloud experience: 

  • Story time or read-aloud live events in which a Nobrow or Flying Eye book is read out loud and the book is displayed may be streamed live, in real time, on social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, we’d love it if where possible you could tag us in @NobrowPress or @FlyingEyeBooks and the creator(s) of the book along with a link to buy the book. We will also share your reading to our followers.

Reporting requirements – We ask that all educators, librarians, booksellers & bloggers please email [email protected] to let us know of the reading, so that we can let the creator(s) know that it’s happening and also help to share it to a wider audience.


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The Flying Eye Feelings Resource Pack!

Let’s start off this week by getting you and your little ones in touch with your inner feelings! What does the word ‘feelings’ mean to you? How did you feel yesterday? What about today?

We’ve put together these Flying Eye Feelings activity sheets, with an introduction to consider a number of different feelings, which then help children to begin to explore their own feelings and how they affect them. The pack includes structured lesson plans filled with free illustrated extracts from the books, discussion questions and suggested activities perfect for homeschooling and online classes in KS1/KS2.

Books included in this activity pack all teach their own lessons with objectives and outcomes that are covered in the stories⇩⇩⇩

Tough Guys Have Feelings Too by Keith Negley, helps children to identify and express feelings, discuss what people mean when they say ‘tough guy’ and demonstrates that everyone has feelings no matter how ‘tough’ they are!

Using the book, Me and My Fear by Francesca Sanna we teach little ones to reflect on how fear can affect us; share a fear they might have and find strategies to overcome it in future. From this activity sheet, you’ll gain a list of useful phrases and keywords about fear, achieve a ‘My Fear’ worksheet, and a written reflection on sharing our fears ✨

The Immortal Jellyfish by Sang Miao helps little ones to understand some of the difficult emotions associated with loss of a loved one, and explores whether the people we love are always with us in some form. From these activity sheets, you’ll achieve a drawing of a creature you would like to become and a short story about someone you love visiting you in a dream.

The hi-res printable activity sheet pack is available to download here 📩

Books mentioned in this pack are available to order from our website below

We are removing the delivery charge for all orders placed on www.nobrow.net but we encourage you to find out if your local bookshop is offering deliveries if you can.

Please keep an eye on our feeds as we devise a timetable of isolation activities! Stay indoors where you can, keep washing your hands and we hope that you all stay well. Lots of love from Nobrow & Flying Eye HQ.


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DIY with I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast!

Whether you’re brushing up on your home teaching skills or just looking for some fun activities for these fresh spring days, we’ve got you sorted 🌻

I Ate Sunshine For Breakfast by Michael Holland and Philip Giordano is an incredible introduction to the world of plants and is packed full of fascinating facts about the powerful science behind the great green machines of the natural world. This comprehensive guide covers everything from the parts of a plant through to conservation, and is full of inspiration for gardeners both young or old. 

We’ve picked out our favourite nature-based DIY activities from its pages for you and your little ones to crack on with. From how to make your own cornflower slime to making beautiful leaf prints to decorate your home, you’ll need nothing more than what you’ve already got on your shelves and in your garden.

And if you take a try of these activities and would like to see more, grab a copy of I Ate Sunshine For Breakfast from our online shop, or ask your local independent bookstore if they can post you a copy. All copies ordered from our site, Storysmith Books in Bristol or Sevenoaks Books in Kent will come with a free poster and seed packets.

First up…

DIY: Cornflour Slime

Slime: nature edition! For this one all you’ll need is some fine cornflour, water and a bit of food colouring – not a manmade chemical in sight. You could even try making your own food colouring from turmeric, beetroot, or spinach! Truly a-maize-ing stuff.

DIY: Wild Weed Bottle Garden

If you live in a flat or don’t have your own garden, that doesn’t have to stop your gardening adventures. Head along on a walk to a local park or nature spot, and build your very own wild weed bottle garden to take home with you. A free and easy way to bring a bit of nature to your windowsill.

DIY: Leaf Printing

A beautiful way to make some artwork or gifts out of nothing more than leaves, card and a regular ink pad. A wonderful introduction not just to the different types of leaves that have fallen in your garden or local park, but how to do simple and easy printmaking. What else can you find in your garden to print with?

DIY: Invisible Ink

Who knew you can now become a spy with nothing more than a lemon, a pen and a sheet of blank paper?! This magical trick will fool everyone you want to keep secrets from, and is the perfect way to pass notes without those pesky parents knowing a single thing.

DIY: Make Your Own Plant Maze

This insightful activity is not only fun to put together, but demonstrates the incredible way plants grow! Another indoor activity which requires no outside space, you’ll just need some seeds, an old shoebox, and all your creativity.

DIY: Bean Bag Boules

Finally, a use for those oversized multicoloured socks your gran got you last Christmas! Just follow the instructions below to make your very own bean bags, ideal for any range of home-PE lessons.

If you enjoyed these activities then don’t wait to order your own copy of I Ate Sunshine For Breakfast, which is bursting with even more facts and fun! At a weighty 128 pages, this comprehensive guide will offer your young gardener hours of insight into the natural world, and help water their budding passion for science and nature.

I Ate Sunshine For Breakfast was written and researched by the expert ecologist and educator Michael Holland, former head of Education at Chelsea Physic Garden. He has taught tens of thousands of people, aged 2 to 92, about the natural world and is on a mission to educate and inspire people from all walks of life about the powerful world of plants and the vital role they play in our daily lives. 


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A Mouse Called Julian Activity Sheets

Wondering how to keep the little ones busy indoors?

For this week, we’re offering activity and colouring sheets on A Mouse Called Julian, wonderfully illustrated by Joe Todd-Stanton. Julian is a mouse who is perfectly happy avoiding other animals but you can join him for dinner, help bring colour into his life, and learn how to draw your own Julian!

Come join in and read along with Joe to find out what happens when Julian has an unexpected dinner guest…

You can download the hi-res printable worksheet here.

A Mouse Called Julian by Joe Todd-Stanton is available to order from our website here.

We are removing the delivery charge for all orders placed on www.nobrow.net but we encourage you to find out if your local bookshop is offering deliveries if you can.

Please keep an eye on our feeds as we devise a timetable of isolation activities! Stay indoors where you can, keep washing your hands and we hope that you all stay well. Lots of love from Nobrow & Flying Eye HQ.


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One Day on Our Blue Planet… Activity Sheets

During these strange and uncertain times, we know lots of you will be stuck at home in your very own little corner of our blue planet, perhaps with little ones who need lots to keep them busy! We’ll be bringing you lots more activities, posted here over the coming weeks.

To start off with, you can hop along with Ella Bailey’s cute baby animals with these activity and colouring sheets, as they explore their habitats all around the world.

You can download the hi-res printable worksheets here.

You can order any of Ella Bailey’s One Day on our Blue Planet… books from our website here:

We are removing the delivery charge for all orders placed on www.nobrow.net but we encourage you to find out if your local bookshop is offering deliveries if you can.

Please keep an eye on our feeds as we devise a timetable of isolation activities! Stay indoors where you can, keep washing your hands and we hope that you all stay well. Lots of love from Nobrow & Flying Eye HQ.


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Flying Eye Staff Recs

To celebrate the approaching end of 2019 we’re back with our annual Staff Recommendations feature, where some of us here from Flying Eye put forward a book we believe could do with a little bit more loving ❤️

Emily, Senior Editor
One Day Series by Ella Bailey

“I couldn’t decide on just one book, so I chose the super cute, fun and beautiful One Day on our Blue Planet series, by Ella Bailey. Full of facts and adorable animals, these books are great first introductions to non-fiction, whilst also being perfect picture books to treasure.

I mean just look at that cute little lion cub! Who can resist?”

Sam, CEO & Co-Founder
Akissi: More Tales of Mischief by Marguerite Abouet & Mathieu Sapin

“For the most bonkers and raucous collection of comics, Akissi is the boss. More Tales of Mischief brings tears to my eyes and I laugh so hard my brain is starved of oxygen. Perfect gift for nieces and nephews or any children you have no direct responsibility for.

You will be popular with the kids for ever, but the grown-ups will never forgive you!”

Satu, Managing Editor
A Mouse Called Julian by Joe Todd-Stanton

“A Mouse Called Julian is my favourite Flying Eye book of the year because it has a grumpy mouse protagonist who likes to spend time on their own, which I think many of us can relate to. I really enjoyed this lively, funny picture book about the power of friendship and being accepted for who you are, even if you are a fox who wants to eat a grumpy mouse protagonist.”

Michelle, Designer
Monty & the Poodles by Katie Harnett

“Monty and the Poodles is the ideal gift for dog lovers! It’s a great story about friendship and being yourself. The illustrations are beautiful and Katie Harnett has captured the dogs’ expressions perfectly thoughout.”

Ivanna, Designer
Wild by Emily Hughes

And don’t forget – if you see this before December 20th make sure to use the discount code XMAS20 to get 20% off your whole order over at FlyingEye.com


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Flying Eye Gift Guide: Early Readers

Getting a gift for the little ones in your life can be a hard task, especially with all the choice out there! To help you pick the perfect picture book we’ve collected together some of our 2019 titles for you to peruse, whether your young one is looking for their very first book or just another special one to add to their library.

A Mouse Called Julian
Joe Todd Stanton

It’s a lucky child who finds this gorgeous picture book under the tree, this Christmas. Joe Todd-Stanton, winner of the Waterstones Prize for Best Illustrated Book has turned his sights to picture books this year, delivering with this brilliant tale of unlikely friendship, tolerance and altruism.
When introverted mouse Julian finds a fox with its head stuck in his house (“‘I was simply popping in to see if you were ok,’ the fox lied”) he soon discovers that talking with people might not be so bad after all and that friends can come from the most unlikely of places.

The illustrations are to die for and the story has some laugh out loud moments (and one point that’s oh so fun to read aloud), this is going to be the perfect gift for everyone involved.

Professor Astro Cat’s Stargazing
Dr Dominic Walliman & Ben Newman

Professor Astro Cat and his team take readers on a new journey through space helping the biggest ideas seem small enough for young people to understand. They’ll learn how long it takes to walk a light year. Just what is a star? How big is a galaxy? And more and more and more. You might even learn a few things yourself.

Now couple that with the extraordinary vibrant retro artwork and you have a picture book gift that’s worth more than the stars.

Astro Kittens: Into The UnknownAstro Kittens: Cosmic Machines
Dr Dominic Walliman & Ben Newman

And now the toddlers can get in on the action too! These gorgeous little board books pack the brilliance of the Professor Astro Cat series into an even smaller package. Super simple, super colourful, now the littles can start to learn about rockets and rovers, life on other planets, bio-domes and wormholes. It’s never too early to start dreaming about a life in the big black.

Orchestra
Avalon Nuovo & David Doran

But we’re not just inspiring the future astronauts this season. We’re kick-starting the musicians too!

For music lovers of all ages, Orchestra makes a perfect first comprehensive guide on musical theory. Starting with a simple history of the orchestra, it sweeps through the different sections of an orchestral arrangement from string to woodwind to percussion. Then we visit some of the world’s most famous venues and the composers who have inspired generations from Vivaldi to Duke Ellington. Then it roars into a crescendo, leaving the music halls behind to talk about opera, theatre, cinema, myth and legend.
The art is glorious, the content more so. Just buy it already and thank us later.


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Flying Eye Gift Guide: Middle Grade Readers

It’s that festive time of year again! 🎄And because we know that that finding the perfect gift for the ravenous readers in your life can be hard, we’ve put together a list of the very best books for any readers aged 7 and up.

And if something here tickles your fancy, don’t forget we’re currently offering a Christmas discount of 20% off your entire order at Nobrow.net or FlyingEyeBooks.com – just enter the code XMAS20 at checkout. This code will expire on December 20th, so better get shopping!

Hilda Fiction
Luke Pearson, Stephen Davis, Seaerra Miller

If your young reader hasn’t discovered Hilda yet, then your present-buying worries are over!

Available as graphic novels (more pictures than words) or illustrated fiction (more words than pictures), Hilda and her adventures have inspired dolls, merchandise and even a BAFTA-winning cartoon on Netflix.

Smart, headstrong, kind and curious, Hilda lives in the fictional town of Trolberg but loves heading into the wilderness where she has so many cool adventures with grumpy trolls, persnickety elves, lovelorn giants, nightmarish Marras and lost house spirits.

Fun, exciting and total page-turners, there are already six books in the series, so plenty for a young reader to get their teeth into. But if you only want to buy one, then go for the first one, Hilda and the Troll (for the comics) or Hilda and the Hidden People (for the illustrated fiction).

The Secret Lives of Unicorns
Dr Temisa Seraphini & Sophie Robin

If you think your child is too grown-up for a book on unicorns, think again!

This amazing book is great for older readers – a study on unicorns as detailed as any text book. This book looks at the evolution, life cycle, diets, magical properties and anatomy of the unicorn, from the species to be found in the North, to those from the unforgiving deserts on the equator. Written by ‘Professor Temisa Seraphini’ it’s a brilliant way to learn about zoology and conservation and the artwork is completely gorgeous. Perfect for fans of nature and fantasy, with something for both.

Akissi: Tales of Mischief
Marguerite Abouet & Mathieu Sapin

If you’re looking for tales of mischief, adventure and fun then look no further than Akissi. Set in an African village, Akissi gets up to all sorts of shenanigans and scrapes from neighbourhood cats trying to steal her fish, pestering her older brother, starting a new term at school, tackling scary teachers and dealing with school bullies. Following in the footsteps of childhood classics like Just William, Dennis the Menace and Minnie the Minx, Akissi is the perfect embodiment of spirited children everywhere.

Each book is three volumes combined, packed with adventures told in bold colourful comic strips packed with detail and excitement. These are a must-have for the little monster in your life.

Ancient Wonders
by Iris Volant & Avalon Nuovo

How many of the Seven Wonders of the World can you name? With Ancient Wonders you’ll never wonder again. The big double pages with a large illustration of each wonder is absolutely stunning, getting across the true majesty of these incredible constructions. Those alone make this book an ideal gift, but when you see the wealth of knowledge too. Readers will be able to find out how each wonder was built, the myths, gods and rituals that inspired their construction and what happened to them after in simple, exciting language. This is an eye-poppingly gorgeous book and we highly recommend it. 

Hicotea
Lorena Alvarez

In this mesmerising follow-up to Nightlights, Lorena Alvarez explores our relationship with nature and animals, all in her stunning illustrative style.

On a school field trip to the river, Sandy wanders away from her classmates and discovers an empty turtle shell. Peeking through the dark hole, she suddenly finds herself within a magical new dimension. Filled with sculptures, paintings and books, the turtle’s shell is a museum of the natural world. But one painting is incomplete, and the turtle needs Sandy’s help to finish it…

This title can be read as a sequel to Nightlights or as a stand alone comic.

Kai and the Monkey King
Joe Todd Stanton

New from the author of Marcy and the Riddle of the Sphinx, Arthur and the Golden Rope and the award-winning The Secret of Black Rock, comes Kai and the Monkey King. Joe Todd-Stanton just keeps getting better and better and when you see the sumptuous, colourful scenes he has in store for his fans in his latest adventure you’ll see what we mean.

In his new addition to his Brownstone Collection, we head to China where our heroine Kai, looking for more excitement in her life, seeks out the mischievous and rebellious monkey king. But does he bring her what she craves or something more dangerous? Inspired by Chinese myths and history this book is fun, educational and a delight for all the senses.