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Sally Deng On Skyward, WWII History, and Supportive Parents

Skyward: The Story of Female Pilots in WWII is Sally Deng’s debut book, which published earlier this year. What started as a scroll through Pinterest developed into this beautifully-illustrated passion project about three young women who wanted to reach great heights—Hazel is an Asian American living in San Francisco, Marlene is a young woman living in the English countryside, and Lilya is from a small town in Russia. Here Sally tells us all about the fascinating stories she learned while working on this book and answers questions about her creative process, how she conducted her research, and her chocolate-filled studio space.

Nobrow: How did Skyward start? Did you already have a fascination with female pilots in WWII?

Sally: “I was looking through Pinterest in college and found a vintage photo of Hazel Ying Lee—the first Asian American female pilot in the United States. I didn’t think it could be real—how could a woman, especially a Chinese American woman, be allowed near a plane during that time? I spiraled into an internet research hole and came out with a whole series of paintings and drawings inspired by these pilots.”

Nobrow: What kind of research did you do while creating Skyward? Did you get to meet any WWII vets?

Sally: “I checked out quite a few books from my university’s library, and had to dig into out of print books about female pilots from other countries. One of my professor’s mothers was a WASP pilot, and he had hours and hours of recordings of her talking about her experience. One of her stories made the book: she was in her plane, and the oil started to leak. She needed a quick fix, so she took off her shirt to clean the oil off the plane.”

(Note: this is referenced in Skyward on page 54, when Hazel has to make an emergency landing and wipe down the windshield with her blouse.)

Nobrow: Are the stories of the three girls based on anyone in particular? If so, who?

Sally: “Yes. The Asian American pilot is based on Hazel Ying Lee, and Lilya, the girl from Russia, loves to draw, which is also what I love to do. Each one is sort of representative of me in some way.”

Nobrow: What’s a favorite story that didn’t make the book?

Sally: “There was a young girl in America who wanted to be a WASP pilot. She had scheduled her physical, but knew she didn’t meet the minimum weight requirement, so hours before her physical, her mother took her to a nearby diner and she ate until she couldn’t eat anymore. She barely passed the physical, but she did eventually become a pilot.”

Nobrow: Which character in Skyward was the most difficult to create?

Sally: “The character that was the most difficult to draw was Marlene. The English women pilots that I saw photos of always looked so beautiful, like models, with their amazing hair and makeup. That’s totally not me, but I just tried really hard to make Marlene look cool.”

Nobrow: In your research, what little-known facts about the female pilots of WWII did you find?

Sally: “I learned a lot of things. First, doctors in WWII didn’t know much about the female body—all the requirements for passing the physicals were in accordance with male bodies. Also, a lot of flying was learned on the go. The pilots didn’t have time or proper training to learn how to fly each air craft. The UK pilots (the ATA) had manuals they would tuck in their boots, basically ‘Flying This-Type-of-Plane 101.’

In America, many of the women who were pilots came from wealthy families who could fund their pilot lessons, but for those who weren’t, they had to go back to civilian life with little hope of having the money to continue flying on their own. In a lot of their interviews, the women pilots didn’t want it to end. They wanted to keep flying.”

Nobrow: What’s your ideal drawing space and what kind of snacks/beverages does it include?

Sally: “I just moved to a bigger shared studio space, but it doesn’t have windows like my last space. So windows and plants make the space ideal, and I always have chocolate around—it’s probably a vice.”

Nobrow: When did you start drawing? What’s pushed you to keep going?

Sally: “Ever since I could remember. My parents told me I started holding a pencil at 3. My parents really supported me from a young age with drawing. When I was a bit older, I couldn’t sit still, and I kept bothering them, so they sent me to art lessons. When I was trying to choose between colleges, my dad saw that I was hesitating between a studio art school and a regular liberal arts college. He encouraged me to go to the art school. I’m really lucky in that way.”

Skyward: The Story of Female Pilots in WWII is out now. Find a copy at www.penguinrandomhouse.com or www.flyingeyebooks.com


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Come See Luke Pearson, Hilda, and a giant Woff at New York ComicCon
New York ComicCon is coming soon, and we’re so excited to be there for the new Hilda Netflix Show (which premiered Friday, September 21st)! NYCC runs October 4-7 at Javits Center: 655 W 34th St, New York, NY 10001. We have quite a bit in store for Luke Pearson, so get your schedule marked for the show itself, or for some of our great offsite events! We’ll be at ComicCon booth #125 all weekend along with a six foot stuffed Woff. Here are the details on Luke Pearson’s schedule for the weekend!

 

Luke Pearson’s New York ComicCon Schedule:

-Friday, October 5th

Signing at booth #125

3pm-4pm

 

-Friday, October 5th:

Graphic Novel Superstars at Books of Wonder

18 West 18th Street, New York, NY 10011

6pm-8pm

 

-Saturday, October 6th

Storytime at Books Are Magic

225 Smith Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231

2pm-3pm

 

-Sunday, October 7th

From Page To Screen Panel @ ComicCon

12pm-1pm

Javits Center, Room 1A21

 

-Sunday, October 7th

Signing at booth #125

1pm-2pm

We’ll have the Hilda Graphic Novel series for sale, along with Hilda and the Hidden People, and we’re also giving away a limited supply of Hilda dolls with purchase of five of the graphic novels, so don’t miss out.

 


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Hilda the Series Premieres Today on Netflix!

We’re so happy to announce that you can now stream the all-new Hilda series on Netflix! Yesterday, creator of the original Hilda graphic novel series Luke Pearson announced the original music by Grimes featured in the title sequence of the Netflix series.

This morning, the Nobrow team in New York screened the first two episodes for 125 kids from Brooklyn schools at the Brooklyn Public Library. The response was a lot of laughter, and questions about “what happens next?”

 

Sam Arthur, CEO and Co-founder of Nobrow, was excited to say: “Seeing Hilda develop from first sketches to first comic, to first graphic novel series, to TV show airing worldwide on Netflix has been a huge privilege. I’m so proud of what Luke Pearson, Nobrow/Flying Eye, and Silvergate Media have achieved. The last 10 years have been an incredible ride, and I have a feeling it’s just the beginning.”

Check out hildabooks.com for information on getting your own copies of the graphic novels or the first TV tie-in book, Hilda and the Hidden People. And don’t forget to get settled in to watch the entire first season!

 

 

 


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Me and My Fear Goes Back to School!

 

Summer’s almost over and kids are headed back to school, and with that, there are new friends to make, and new stories to hear. In Me and My Fear (out now in the UK, US & Canada), a young immigrant girl starts school in her new country and has to face the challenges of making friends, learning a language, and overcoming her companion Fear, who perches on her shoulder every day—trying to keep her safe.

Me and My Fear is based on research that creator Francesca Sanna did in classrooms—asking children to draw their fears and encouraging them to talk about what made them afraid. To accompany this book, we’ve created a classroom guide, complete with activities and levelling information for teachers, students, and librarians to use for this upcoming year. You can download whichever version applies to you at the links below.

US Classroom Guide

UK Classroom Guide

We hope that Francesca’s experience working with immigrant children will provide depth to your classrooms and conversations this year!

Author’s Note:

“I am a very anxious person, and at times when working on this book, my fear would grow too big and grip me too tightly. I would not have succeeded without the precious help of many people. Firstly, I would like to thank each and every child I met in schools and libraries, who was willing to share their fears about being the new one, the different one, the one from another country. They helped keep my own fear from growing too large.”—Francesca Sanna

Praise for The Journey

Many of you know Francesca from her brilliant debut picture book, The Journey. With six starred reviews, and acknowledgement on Best of lists from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, School Library Journal, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, and the New York Public Library, The Journey moved readers with the illustrated story of a family forced from their homes, gently introducing children to what it means to be a refugee. Now, Francesca brings us into the story of one young girl, overcoming her struggles to feel at home in her new country.

“This heart-stopping, visually sophisticated story of a happy family suddenly forced to flee their home because of war evokes the dark danger of fairy tales to present the stark realities and enduring hope of modern refugees.”
The New York Times, Notable Children’s Books of 2016

“Direct in language and lush in colorful illustration, this poignant picture book for readers ages 6-10 nurtures compassion for real-life refugees.”
The Wall Street Journal, The Best Children’s Books of 2016

The Journey offers a beautiful message to readers — young and old alike — about the difficulties of finding a new home, and the value of welcoming strangers once they arrive.”
The Washington Post

“A necessary, artful, and searing story.”
Kirkus Reviews, STARRED REVIEW

“The innocent voice and dramatic graphic-style illustrations tell a harrowing, haunting, yet hopeful story of a family’s search for a place to call home.”
School Library Journal, Best Picture Books of 2016

“Given the ongoing refugee crisis in Europe and immigration debates in the U.S. and abroad, Sanna’s story is well poised to spark necessary conversations about the costs of war.”
Publisher’s Weekly, STARRED REVIEW


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Find Nobrow/Flying Eye at Children’s Institute and ALA!

Nobrow and Flying Eye Books will be attending the American Booksellers Association’s ABC Children’s Institute from June 19-21st and the American Library Association’s Annual Conference from June 22-25th in New Orleans! Here is a rundown of all that we have going on.

Children’s Institute Events

On the opening night of Children’s Institute (June 19th), we’re throwing an exclusive HILDA Netflix Screening Party at the Sheraton New Orleans Hotel in room Grand B. We’ll kick things off at 9pm with popcorn and Hilda swag. No need to RSVP but if you’re a bookseller, sign up here to receive a Hilda Display Kit for your store! Don’t forget to pick up a copy the TV Tie-in Hilda chapter book: Hilda and the Hidden People.

On June 20th, come meet the talented Hamish Steele, author of the upcoming Deadendia: The Watcher’s Test at the Author Signing Reception from 5:40-7:00pm in the Armstrong Ballroom.

ALA Annual: Nobrow / Flying Eye Booth #2158

Friday, June 22nd at 10:30am:  Hamish Steele will be on the Library Con Panel “Reaching Diverse Voices,” with Mariko Tamaki, Danielle Paige, Ridley Pearson, and Kami Garcia, in the Morial Convention Center Room 348-349. To attend this event you must be registered for ALA and sign up here.

Saturday, June 23rd: We’ll be in our booth # 2158 all day (9am-5pm) with giveaways!

Sunday, June 24th at 2:30pm: Hamish Steele will be at the Children’s Comics Crossing Continents Panel on the Graphic Novel Stage.

3:45pm: Hamish will be back at our booth in the exhibit hall for a signing (it’s booth #2158—don’t forget!).

Monday, June 25th at 10:30am: Don’t miss our exclusive screening of the HILDA Netflix Original Series in New Orleans Theater, Section C, in the Morial Convention Center. This screening will offer librarians a chance to see the first two episodes of Hilda months before it airs on Netflix! The series follows the journey of a fearless blue-haired girl as she travels from her magical home in the wilderness, filled with elves and giants, to the bustling city of Trolberg. Don’t forget that this is also your sneak peak at Hilda and the Hidden People, the first Hilda illustrated chapter book and companion to the Netflix original animation.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter to stay abreast of all the updates! We can’t wait to see you!


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Plunge into the heart of Italy with The Diver in our interview with Veronica Carratello

 

The charming and colourful picture book The Diver is out now! Veronica Carratello is an illustrator and comic book artist who has worked with a number of clients including Netflix, Circle Dei Lettori, and has been a part of several exhibitions throughout Italy. We had a chat with Veronica and here she shares more about herself and her story…

1. Your book brings out essential topics that children and also adults deal with throughout their lives such as the self-confidence to believe in and achieve their own dreams. How did you come up with the idea of this beautiful story?

The idea came to me by chance. I could not sleep and I started thinking about how coins are flipped into fountains to make wishes, and I asked myself, what if the coin had a dream of its own? And then I started to develop the story.

At the beginning, Emma was a minor character. But after developing the story with the editor’s advice she became a main character alongside the coin, and the story shows their two lives happening side-by-side. Emma represents commitment to achieving a dream, and the coin represents strength of character. Both of them have moments of concern, as it usually happens in life.

2. Italy is well-known for its Trevi Fountain coin toss tradition and all the popular beliefs about it. Did you draw your inspiration from it to shape the personality of your main character?

Yes, I draw my inspiration from it and I’m fascinated by popular beliefs. If you toss a coin into Trevi Fountain, which I did, it means that you’ll return to Rome one day. But there is also a legend that if you flip a penny into a fountain and make a wish, it will come true.

I have to confess that before sending you the proposal of my book The Diver, I flipped a coin into a fountain too… and my wish came true!

3. Did you put yourself into your characters?

Like my characters, I believe in dreams, and my favourite quote is “If you can dream it, you can do it!” by Walt Disney. I like it because you can convince yourself that nothing is impossible, like the coin’s dream of being a diver, but I think that to achieve our goals, we also need to work hard and be determined, like Emma.

4. If you could have done something different as a child to achieve a dream as an adult, what would you do?

I would probably be a musician. I’ve always had a passion for music: a few years ago I wrote songs and played guitar in a band, I think it’s a nice way to tell a story too.

5. What is the main thing you want readers to learn from your book?

The main thing I want my readers to learn is that it doesn’t matter how small you are or how big your dream is, if you work hard and you really want it, your dream will come true!


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10 Tips to Foster Emotional Intelligence in Children

 

By Rachel Woodworth

As a child, my personality was quiet and reserved, but my feelings were noisy. I was a stomper and a door-slammer — tucked in the middle of the sibling order. In retrospect, I see those characters from the animated movie, Inside Out sitting at the dashboard, haphazardly pushing buttons and battling for control. They acted independently of me, and they longed for expression — longed to be seen and heard (ahem — stomp, stomp). They often appeared in writing: in notes and stories, in journal entries and, as a small girl, in posters strewn across the house for my parents to find, depicting my honest, and probably unhelpful, feelings regarding the discipline of practicing piano (“I HATE PIANO”).

Sharp edges soften. That angry sadness, along with its note-scrawling, door-slamming and foot-stomping, finds a fullness of expression and, often, a quietness. That once-slammed door is sheepishly opened. This is the arc that my first picture book, Out, Out, Away From Here (illustrated by Sang Miao), follows. The story moves readers from the fullness of that noisy feeling — of MAD-SAD-GLAD — to a peace and quiet that we can all find within the space of our own imaginations. No matter how small, we all need to learn emotional intelligence, and that requires practice, care, and patience.

Though I don’t have formal child psychology training, I have spent a lot of time with children, teaching them and learning from them, in daycares and preschools, as a private tutor, as a homeschool teacher. Children have a lot to teach us. They navigate the world with lighthearted wonder, with honest and direct thought and feeling, and with an attention to the present moment. As we teach and care and parent them, we have much to learn from them — to learn together.

How do we encourage emotional intelligence in young children? How do we empower kids to cope with and carry feelings in healthy ways?

1. Remember, Feelings Begin Physically

Tantrums, stomping, frowning, fist-clenching. Identifying feelings is a challenge for all of us — grown-up or not. Young children may only know how to verbally express happy, sad, and mad. While still learning ways to channel and show these feelings, they will express themselves physically. We can help children to identify the clues their bodies/behaviors give them about those unnamed feelings.

2. Encourage, empower, and guide children to name their own feelings

Ask open-ended, exploratory questions. Try to veer away from questions with yes/no answers. Example: How are you feeling? What happened to make you feel this way? What can we do to calm you down or cheer you up?

3. Affirm that feelings are legitimate

Feeling sad, tired, grumpy, nervous, excited — these feelings are real and often important. Let children know that this is normal and okay, that adults feel these too. Share your experiences and strategies with children. When you’re feeling a certain way, how do you cope? We may not choose our feelings, but we can choose how to express them. My parents’ repeated advice was this: “you may be feeling this way, but you don’t need to act this way” (this was usually tired and grumpy, they were referring to).

4. Allow space

Children need access to the outdoors to experience the quiet, beauty, and wonder of nature. Feelings need room to spread out.

5. Step back

In the midst of noisy feelings, children and caretakers can benefit from a pause. “Taking five” was a tool I used in the classroom to allow students (often frustrated and unproductive) five minutes to use in their own, quiet way — often with a pile of books. They, and I, often returned to the task more calm and ready.

6. Read illustrated books aloud

This medium offers children language higher than their level of expression — but not their level of understanding. Books give kids a greater ability to hold and communicate feelings.

7. Give feelings feet!

Encourage children to let their feelings move. If they’re happy feelings — or any sort of feeling, really — dance! As an adult, too, I have to remind myself to sometimes leave my brain and heart behind. Take a walk, write in a journal, create art, play. Move!

8. Help children to recognize that feelings are temporary

A wise friend of mine says you feel feelings — but you aren’t your feelings. Imagine them like visitors. How can we take care of them while they’re here? What can we learn from them? They’ll show themselves out, when they’re ready. They’ll come and go again.

9. Teach that caring for ourselves helps us to care for others

Learning to recognize and care for our own emotions is a necessary precursor to practicing compassion. Encouraging children to know and recognize their own feelings will help them to observe the same in others — and to practice compassion.

10. Remind children that feelings are complicated and that it’s okay

Feelings are often more muddled-up than happy, sad, or mad, but that makes it so important to talk through them.

The world of feelings is wonderful and complicated. It’s a world we all carry within us, child and adult alike. Guiding children to carry their emotions in appropriate ways will lead to healthier children and, someday, healthier adults — capable of caring for themselves and for others. Join me in a journey we all take, over and over again, out, out, away from here — through that mountainous terrain of feeling.

(Art by Sang Miao, © Flying Eye Books)

Download your own copy of this poster: low-res, or high-res.

Rachel Woodworth grew up in Canada and graduated from a liberal arts university in the United States. With an ongoing wonder with words and the world, writing has accompanied her for the whole of her travels. Out, Out, Away From Here (published by Flying Eye Books) is Rachel’s first book and is available now. She is currently living in Tanzania.


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Studio Dreams at Hay Festival!

Join us at Hay Festival of Literature and art for a day of workshops and events based around Nobrow 10: Studio Dream magazine. In Association with ELCAF, we’re bringing four of the Nobrow 10 magazine illustrators to the festival and taking over The Cube for a day of workshops and activities and to discuss about their work, inspiration and more!

On Sunday 27th May, join us on the festival site for any (or all!) of these sessions:

Who: Katie Harnett

When: 11:30 am

Where: The Cube

The author’s picture-book Ivy and the Lonely Raincloud is a heart-warming tale about finding friendship in unexpected places. Enjoy the story and help our magical paper-flower garden grow by making your very own raincloud friend.

Get your ticket!

 Who: Joe Todd-Stanton

When: 1 pm

Where: The Cube

Discover the amazing creatures that live under the sea in a workshop with the illustrator based on his picture-book, a surreal, modern folktale about an adventurous little girl who must protect a peaceful living creature. Children can create sea creatures as part of a large-scale mural, then take them home.

Get your ticket!

 Who: Jim Stoten

When: 2:30 pm

This search-and-find adventure story is packed with riddles that you need to help solve. Tasks will be placed around the room and will include both paper and 3D searches.

Get your ticket!

Who: Ben Newman

When: 4 pm

Where: The Cube

A hands-on, family, drawing and mark making workshop where children can create their dream school, library and bedroom based on the Nobrow magazine illustrator’s work. Would you include a ball pool, a cinema, or a slide…or all of these and more? It’s entirely up to you!

Get your ticket!

  Studio Dreams Panel (Katie Harnett, Joe Todd-Stanton, Jim Stoten, Ben Newman)

When: 5:30 pm

Join the Nobrow magazine illustrators as they discuss their work and how the environment in which we work affects what we make. The Nobrow tenth anniversary magazine celebrates 70 different illustrators’ vision of their ideal workspaces, if the sky was the limit.

Get your ticket!

See you there!


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An Interview with the Creators of Akissi : Tales of Mischief
After the success of Aya of Yop City comics, published by Gallimard BD, the Ivorian author Marguerite Abouet brings back her best childhood memories with Akissi : Tales of Mischief. An expanded paperback edition with new, hilarious stories that Marguerite Abouet and Mathieu Sapin, the illustrator, took time to tell us a bit more about – giving us an insight into their work and this cheeky little girl.

1. You were born in Abidjan and you grew up there until you were 12 years old, does Akissi represent a younger version of you?

“Akissi is definitely me. The story is about a happy childhood, the good memories of a young Ivorian girl before she leaves her country for France at a young age without her parents. By publishing the story, I can share my childhood and memories with others.”—Marguerite Abouet

2. How did you work together to find the right chemistry between text and image?

“I’m used to storyboarding, so I can easily put myself in children’s shoes. Mathieu Sapin and I read through it together and we consult each other a lot to find the right chemistry between the text and the illustrations. Sometimes our characters don’t need to talk, as the illustration conveys emotion by itself.”—Marguerite Abouet

“At first, Marguerite makes a storyboard and when we meet we cut it up and talk about it. She gives me details on the story, the characters, the setting, etc. Sometimes, she imitates some of the characters! It’s very funny. When we’ve agreed on the story, I get straight to drawing. Marguerite make few comments or modifications as well, which I integrate into the final artwork.”—Mathieu Sapin

3. What special research did you carry out to be able to recreate Akissi’s world?

“Akissi’s world needed to be relevant, so everything in my story had to be accurate from the outset. This meant specific places and specific children with their own particular characters. I started by creating the atmosphere, then the setting, characters and finally the tales. Readers have to believe in the characters and feel like they are in Akissi’s neighbourhood.”—Marguerite Abouet

“I drew the first volumes of Akissi without having been to Africa before, so I took inspiration from the internet, books and Marguerite’s descriptions. Clément Oubrerie, the cartoonist of Aya, had done some research previously so he gave me a lot of documents and details about the characters. Finally, I went to Abidjan briefly with Marguerite. I walked around, I took some pictures, but mostly I tried to immerse myself in the city. I definitely have fond memories of it. Now I’m gathering more materials on the internet to further my research.”—Mathieu Sapin

4. Akissi is a true adventurer, she’s always getting into trouble and we feel that every child could relate to her character in their own way although she’s from a culture and community that may be very different from their own. Is that something you particularly wanted to represent?

“Yeah that’s what I like with this series, the connection to freedom and adventure! Nowadays I believe the value of this is diminished in our society, where children are constantly watched. I grew up in the countryside, where kids were left to their own devices — it was wonderful! Even if, as a parent, I’m of course very vigilant and would have difficulty letting my kids have as much freedom as Akissi and her friends do.”—Mathieu Sapin

“Akissi and her friends are quite positive kids, of course with some faults, but always joyful and energetic — so any child can identify with them. Akissi shows the reader her world throughout her tales. She highlights companionship, encourages tolerance and reminds us how difference and diversity can be beneficial. Akissi and her group are definitely the true heroes because they fight against fears, rejections, and ethnic self-segregation. Akissi’s tales show how to treat others with respect, without judgement or bias, or any distinction of race, sex, religion or handicap. She embodies all of that, and that’s why she speaks to every child.”—Marguerite Abouet

5. How does it feel to see Akissi’s stories being translated into different languages? And how have children from around the world responded to her tales?

“I really like the global dimension of Marguerite’s stories. I’ve travelled a lot with Akissi and I notice the same feeling everywhere. I believe all kids can see themselves in her, because she speaks straight to them with her endearing but also mischievous nature. Surprisingly, this series appeals just as much to boys as to girls.”—Mathieu Sapin

“I think Akissi is like open-air theatre, where children can feel quickly gripped by her tales. She invites them to journey to an unknown country, that is so close and yet so far away from them, for a relaxed ramble in Africa. Children are impressed by Akissi and her group because they are like ‘urban superheroes’ trying to live in the adult world. She shows them that this is not easy, because living together and accepting each other are daily struggles, so it demands a lot of willpower and courage.”—Marguerite Abouet

Flying Eye Books 


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Emily Hughes Wins Theodor Seuss Geisel Award

Congratulations to the creator of Wild and The Little Gardener, Emily Hughes, for winning the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award from the American Library Association. Announced Monday, February 12, Hughes along with writer Laurel Snyder won the award for Charlie & Mouse.

Emily’s lush, playful titles have received rave attention since the beginning.   

The Little Gardener was an NPR Best Book of 2015, and the New York Times praised, “Hughes’s illustrations thrum with life. The drawings are a tangle of Gauguin and Rousseau and botanical journals.”

As for Wild, the story of a little girl who simply won’t be tamed, Maria Popova of Brain Pickings said it was “an irreverent, charming, and oh-so-delightfully illustrated story, partway between Kipling’s The Jungle Book and Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are . . . Wild is one of the loveliest and most endearing picture-books I’ve seen.”

These stunning titles are available for purchase anywhere books are sold or on the Nobrow website. We wish Emily Hughes all the best in this prestigious win.


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Find Nobrow/Flying Eye Books at ABA’s Winter Institute and ALA Midwinter

Memphis and Denver, Nobrow is coming for you!

We’ll be at the American Booksellers Association’s Winter Institute (running January 22 to 25) in Memphis, Tennessee. Say hello to US Sales and Marketing Associate Director, Hannah Moushabeck on Meet the Presses Day: January 25, 9:15am to 12pm; 1:30pm to 7pm. Booksellers will have the opportunity to meet with Hannah for an informal conversation, and pick up an advance copy of Professor Astro Cat’s Human Body Odyssey (forthcoming in March).

Then, running from February 9 to 12, Nobrow will be in Denver, Colorado for the American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting. Come say hello to us at Booth #1111 in the Exhibit Hall at the Colorado Convention Center! Pick up a poster, buttons, and enter our raffle for a chance to win our full Hilda series and a Hilda doll.

We hope to catch you at one of these events. You won’t want to miss this chance at an early sneak peek of our Spring 2018 list of children’s books and graphic novels!


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Final Posting Dates for Christmas!
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That most wonderful time of year is fast approaching and we don’t want you to miss out on getting hold of Nobrow and Flying Eye gifts for your nearest and dearest! So here are the all important last recommended posting dates for shipping all around the world!

Be careful not to leave it too late though as any orders received on these dates are not guaranteed to arrive in time for Christmas, although we will try our very best.

Saturday 2nd December Africa, Middle East
Wednesday 6th December Cyprus, Asia, Far East (including Japan), Eastern Europe (except Poland, Czech Republic and Slovakia), Turkey, Malta
Thursday 7th December Caribbean, Central & South America
Saturday 9th December Greece, Australia, New Zealand
Wednesday 13th December Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Poland
Thursday 14th December Canada, Finland, Sweden, USA
Friday 15th December Austria, Denmark, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Switzerland
Saturday 16th December Belgium, France
Wednesday 20th December UK Second Class
Thursday 21st December UK First Class

 

Export customers, make sure you send your festive orders over to [email protected] as soon as you can because these take longer to process and pack!


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Nobrow Presents… Pop-Up Lab 2017

10th November | Peterborough, UK

Nobrow / Flying Eye Books are proud to announce our partnership with Pop Up and Transbook to bring you an exciting new practice-sharing conference for children’s literature and education professionals featuring over 30 hands-on workshops, demonstrations, collaborations and converstations… Pop Up Lab

10th November 2017 | Peterborough UK

Invigorate your teaching practice or literature programming by exploring imaginative approaches to engaging young readers and writers through visual storytelling.

Pop Up Lab is cross-sector space in which to explore and experiment, share practice and learn new things. A keynote conversation will kickstart the day, and attendees will be able to choose up to two 75-minute sessions from a programme of hands-on workshops, demonstrations and conversations with 10 organisations and individuals. Many sessions are artist-led. Throughout the day facilitated discussions will help evolve a ‘manifesto’ to advance the cause of visual storytelling in schools and curriculums.

Lab 2017 involves organisations in the Transbook project. Transbook is a European initiative to promote the digital transition and internationalisation of the children’s publishing industry. Transbook is co- nanced by the Creative Europe programme of the European Union and operated by seven European partners from the children’s publishing industry.

A full programme schedule is available www.pop-up.org.uk/lab2017 and attendees will be asked to choose sessions in advance. Tickets available: here

Sessions by: Art Basics for Children (Belgium) / Centre for Literacy in Primary Education / Government Art Collection / Lisa Tilesi / Literature Wales / Metal Culture / Nobrow & MiniLab / Positive Negatives / Stephen Spender Trust / Tantagora (Spain) / Tiny Owl plus illustrators and comics artists from Estonia, Lithuania, France, England, Wales and Ireland

Pop Up Lab is presented in association with Nobrow & Transbook and supported by Paul Hamlyn Foundation


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Nobrow is coming to ALA Chicago!

CHICAGO!
Make sure you’re free from June 22nd through June 27th because Nobrow is coming over for this year’s ALA Annual, and we have a feeling this show is going to be a BEAST!

We’ll set up our Nobrow HQ at Booth 3121, where you can stop by and check out all of our latest releases, our greatest hits, and maybe even take a peek at some upcoming titles that will be lighting up a bookstore near you later this year. There’s also going to be plenty of awesome giveaways!

But that’s not all– not even close!

We’re also going to be bringing you the talents of SAM BOSMA (Fantasy Sports series) and JEN LEE (Garbage Night), and we’re teaming up with the French Comics Association to bring over MARGUERITE ABOUET (Akissi) and JÉRÉMIE ROYER (Audubon, On the Wings of the World). That’s FOUR Nobrow artists to see at panels and signings at ALA!


Let’s break it down real quick:

SIGNINGS
June 22
7-9pm, Sector 2337
Live reading and book signing with Marguerite Abouet, Jérémie Royer, and others!

June 24
11-11:30am, Nobrow Booth 3121
Sam Bosma signing

11:45-12:45pm, FCA Booth 1229
Jérémie Royer signing

1-2pm, FCA Booth 1229
Marguerite Abouet signing

2:30-3pm, Nobrow Booth 3121
Marguerite Abouet signing

4:45pm, CIAO CHICAGO, 1656 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60622
Drawn In Europe: The Art of European Comics Comes to Chicago
Jérémie Royer signing

6:30pm, The Book Cellar
Author Speed Dating with Marguerite Abouet

June 25
10:30-11:30am, FCA Booth 1229
Marguerite Abouet and Jérémie Royer signing

12-12:30, Nobrow Booth 3121
Jen Lee signing

1:30-2pm, Nobrow Booth 3121
Jérémie Royer signing

4-4:30pm, FCA Booth 1229
Marguerite Abouet signing



PANELS
JUNE 23
1:10-2pm
Problem Solving: Teaching STEM with Comics, w/ Jérémie Royer

2:05pm
Books That Spark Change: Using comics and graphic novels as a jumping off point, w/ Marguerite Abouet

3pm
Meet the Makers, w/ Marguerite Abouet, Jérémie Royer

June 24
10:30-11:30am, McCormick Hall, room W175b
Graphic Memoirs: how non-fiction graphic novels bring real lives to life, w/ Jérémie Royer

June 25
9:30-10:20am, Graphic Novel/Gaming: Next to booth 1128
How to Write for Children and Young Adults, w/ Marguerite Abouet, Jérémie Royer

10:30-11:20am
Comics at the Frontier of a New Literary Movement, w/ Sam Bosma, Jen Lee

1-2:30pm, Hyatt Regency McCormick, Jackson Park/CC 10AB
Universal Language of Comics: Culture and Creation Beyond America, w/ Marguerite Abouet

3-3:50pm, Graphic Novel/Gaming: Next to booth 1128
French Comics on Screen: Film Adaptations of Franco-Belgian Graphic Narratives, w/ Marguerite Abouet


Like we said, between all the fun events, panels, signings, and giveaways, it’s going to be one big BEAST of a show. We hope you can make it! If you want to schedule some time to meet up with us and say hi, send an email over to [email protected]. We can’t wait to see you there!


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Easter Events Calendar

Nobrow & Flying Eye Books – Easter Events

This Easter holiday, we are heading out and about with lots of our authors and illustrators for all sorts of exciting events at some of our favourite bookshops, festivals… and even a castle!

Here’s where we’ll be:

Under-The-Sea

Who: Joe Todd-Stanton

When: Monday 3rd April

Where: Waterstones Piccadilly

Joe Todd-Stanton joins us to celebrate the release of his new book, The Secret of Black Rock. Featuring strong female characters, epic adventure and a friendly island(!) this beautiful story is a must for children and adults alike. Come and enjoy a story reading, sea creatures fact sheets and tropical fish collage as part of our Children’s Easter Festival. This event is free however please email to guarantee your spot. Ideal for ages 4-9.

Little Gardening

Who: Emily Hughes

When: Wednesday 5th April, 13:00 -14:00

Where: Waterstones Piccadilly

Spring has sprung with The Little Gardener! Author and illustrator Emily Hughes joins us to celebrate the changing seasons and the release of her beautiful new book. As well as a story reading we will be decorating our own plant pots and planting our own sunflower in this fun and educational activity session, part of our Children’s Easter Festival. Perfect for ages 3-7.

Mr Tweed’s Treasure Hunt

Who: Jim Stoten

When: Thursday 6th April

Where: Waterstones Piccadilly

Join author and illustrator Jim Stoten to celebrate Mr Tweed’s Busy Day. This search-and-find adventure story is packed with riddles that we need you to help us solve. Tasks will be placed around the children’s section and will include both paper and 3D searches – with Easter themed prizes! This is event forms part of our Children’s Easter Festival. This event is free however please email to guarantee your spot. Perfect for ages 5-9.

Bunnies Galore

Who: Pippa Goodhart

When: Tuesday 11th April, 13:00 -14:00

Where: Waterstones Piccadilly

Rabbits, bunnies, hoppity hops, call them what you like but we LOVE bunnies! This Easter join author Pippa Goodhart for a range of rabbity stories, songs and games to celebrate her new book My Very Own Space as part of our Children’s Easter Festival. This event is free however please email to guarantee your space. Perfect for ages up to 6.

Leporello Making Workshop

Who: Tom Clohosy Cole

When: 12th April, 11-12 and 2-3pm

Where: Libreria Bookshop, 65 Hanbury Street

Join us at Libreria for an interstellar drawing workshop with illustrator Tom Clohosy Cole. Based upon his beautiful leporello ‘Space Race’, participants will be invited to draw planets, rockets and all else that might be found amongst the stars, creating their very own concertina book to take home. Suitable for ages 5+

Get Smart About Sharks 

Who: Owen Davey

When: 21st April 2017, 13:00 to 16:00

Where: IKON Gallery

Help illustrator Owen Davey transform the Events Room into an underwater seascape inspired by his book, Smart about Sharks. Learn about different types of marine creatures and create your own using a range of materials.

 

Foyles x ELCAF – Draw Big

Who: Katie Harnett

When: Saturday 22nd April, 11:00 – 12:00

Where: Foyles Chelmsford

Foyles x ELCAF is a new collaboration which sees the UK’s largest independent bookshop teaming up with the East London Comic & Arts Festival to celebrate some of the best creative talent in the UK. This year, we open our doors in Chelmsford, London, Birmingham and Bristol to host a series of workshops, talks and one-to-one meetings with illustrators, comic artists and experts in the field. Curated by ELCAF, this eclectic programme aims to celebrate the dynamic work of artists that are making waves in the UK’s independent comic, narrative art and illustration scene. This is the first in the series and is a children’s event focussing on the art of drawing big.

Artist and illustrator, Katie Harnett will be leading a hands-on workshop for budding artists. Katie specialises in children’s books and has worked on both picture books and book covers.  Join in the fun of creating a large scale collaborative drawing and learn all about how to ‘draw big’. This event is suitable for children aged 5-10 years.