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Hilda the Series Premieres Today on Netflix!

We’re so happy to announce that you can now stream the all-new Hilda series on Netflix! Yesterday, creator of the original Hilda graphic novel series Luke Pearson announced the original music by Grimes featured in the title sequence of the Netflix series.

This morning, the Nobrow team in New York screened the first two episodes for 125 kids from Brooklyn schools at the Brooklyn Public Library. The response was a lot of laughter, and questions about “what happens next?”

 

Sam Arthur, CEO and Co-founder of Nobrow, was excited to say: “Seeing Hilda develop from first sketches to first comic, to first graphic novel series, to TV show airing worldwide on Netflix has been a huge privilege. I’m so proud of what Luke Pearson, Nobrow/Flying Eye, and Silvergate Media have achieved. The last 10 years have been an incredible ride, and I have a feeling it’s just the beginning.”

Check out hildabooks.com for information on getting your own copies of the graphic novels or the first TV tie-in book, Hilda and the Hidden People. And don’t forget to get settled in to watch the entire first season!

 

 

 


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Me and My Fear Goes Back to School!

 

Summer’s almost over and kids are headed back to school, and with that, there are new friends to make, and new stories to hear. In Me and My Fear (out now in the UK, US & Canada), a young immigrant girl starts school in her new country and has to face the challenges of making friends, learning a language, and overcoming her companion Fear, who perches on her shoulder every day—trying to keep her safe.

Me and My Fear is based on research that creator Francesca Sanna did in classrooms—asking children to draw their fears and encouraging them to talk about what made them afraid. To accompany this book, we’ve created a classroom guide, complete with activities and levelling information for teachers, students, and librarians to use for this upcoming year. You can download whichever version applies to you at the links below.

US Classroom Guide

UK Classroom Guide

We hope that Francesca’s experience working with immigrant children will provide depth to your classrooms and conversations this year!

Author’s Note:

“I am a very anxious person, and at times when working on this book, my fear would grow too big and grip me too tightly. I would not have succeeded without the precious help of many people. Firstly, I would like to thank each and every child I met in schools and libraries, who was willing to share their fears about being the new one, the different one, the one from another country. They helped keep my own fear from growing too large.”—Francesca Sanna

Praise for The Journey

Many of you know Francesca from her brilliant debut picture book, The Journey. With six starred reviews, and acknowledgement on Best of lists from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, School Library Journal, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, and the New York Public Library, The Journey moved readers with the illustrated story of a family forced from their homes, gently introducing children to what it means to be a refugee. Now, Francesca brings us into the story of one young girl, overcoming her struggles to feel at home in her new country.

“This heart-stopping, visually sophisticated story of a happy family suddenly forced to flee their home because of war evokes the dark danger of fairy tales to present the stark realities and enduring hope of modern refugees.”
The New York Times, Notable Children’s Books of 2016

“Direct in language and lush in colorful illustration, this poignant picture book for readers ages 6-10 nurtures compassion for real-life refugees.”
The Wall Street Journal, The Best Children’s Books of 2016

The Journey offers a beautiful message to readers — young and old alike — about the difficulties of finding a new home, and the value of welcoming strangers once they arrive.”
The Washington Post

“A necessary, artful, and searing story.”
Kirkus Reviews, STARRED REVIEW

“The innocent voice and dramatic graphic-style illustrations tell a harrowing, haunting, yet hopeful story of a family’s search for a place to call home.”
School Library Journal, Best Picture Books of 2016

“Given the ongoing refugee crisis in Europe and immigration debates in the U.S. and abroad, Sanna’s story is well poised to spark necessary conversations about the costs of war.”
Publisher’s Weekly, STARRED REVIEW


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Find Nobrow/Flying Eye at Children’s Institute and ALA!

Nobrow and Flying Eye Books will be attending the American Booksellers Association’s ABC Children’s Institute from June 19-21st and the American Library Association’s Annual Conference from June 22-25th in New Orleans! Here is a rundown of all that we have going on.

Children’s Institute Events

On the opening night of Children’s Institute (June 19th), we’re throwing an exclusive HILDA Netflix Screening Party at the Sheraton New Orleans Hotel in room Grand B. We’ll kick things off at 9pm with popcorn and Hilda swag. No need to RSVP but if you’re a bookseller, sign up here to receive a Hilda Display Kit for your store! Don’t forget to pick up a copy the TV Tie-in Hilda chapter book: Hilda and the Hidden People.

On June 20th, come meet the talented Hamish Steele, author of the upcoming Deadendia: The Watcher’s Test at the Author Signing Reception from 5:40-7:00pm in the Armstrong Ballroom.

ALA Annual: Nobrow / Flying Eye Booth #2158

Friday, June 22nd at 10:30am:  Hamish Steele will be on the Library Con Panel “Reaching Diverse Voices,” with Mariko Tamaki, Danielle Paige, Ridley Pearson, and Kami Garcia, in the Morial Convention Center Room 348-349. To attend this event you must be registered for ALA and sign up here.

Saturday, June 23rd: We’ll be in our booth # 2158 all day (9am-5pm) with giveaways!

Sunday, June 24th at 2:30pm: Hamish Steele will be at the Children’s Comics Crossing Continents Panel on the Graphic Novel Stage.

3:45pm: Hamish will be back at our booth in the exhibit hall for a signing (it’s booth #2158—don’t forget!).

Monday, June 25th at 10:30am: Don’t miss our exclusive screening of the HILDA Netflix Original Series in New Orleans Theater, Section C, in the Morial Convention Center. This screening will offer librarians a chance to see the first two episodes of Hilda months before it airs on Netflix! The series follows the journey of a fearless blue-haired girl as she travels from her magical home in the wilderness, filled with elves and giants, to the bustling city of Trolberg. Don’t forget that this is also your sneak peak at Hilda and the Hidden People, the first Hilda illustrated chapter book and companion to the Netflix original animation.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter to stay abreast of all the updates! We can’t wait to see you!


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10 Tips to Foster Emotional Intelligence in Children

 

By Rachel Woodworth

As a child, my personality was quiet and reserved, but my feelings were noisy. I was a stomper and a door-slammer — tucked in the middle of the sibling order. In retrospect, I see those characters from the animated movie, Inside Out sitting at the dashboard, haphazardly pushing buttons and battling for control. They acted independently of me, and they longed for expression — longed to be seen and heard (ahem — stomp, stomp). They often appeared in writing: in notes and stories, in journal entries and, as a small girl, in posters strewn across the house for my parents to find, depicting my honest, and probably unhelpful, feelings regarding the discipline of practicing piano (“I HATE PIANO”).

Sharp edges soften. That angry sadness, along with its note-scrawling, door-slamming and foot-stomping, finds a fullness of expression and, often, a quietness. That once-slammed door is sheepishly opened. This is the arc that my first picture book, Out, Out, Away From Here (illustrated by Sang Miao), follows. The story moves readers from the fullness of that noisy feeling — of MAD-SAD-GLAD — to a peace and quiet that we can all find within the space of our own imaginations. No matter how small, we all need to learn emotional intelligence, and that requires practice, care, and patience.

Though I don’t have formal child psychology training, I have spent a lot of time with children, teaching them and learning from them, in daycares and preschools, as a private tutor, as a homeschool teacher. Children have a lot to teach us. They navigate the world with lighthearted wonder, with honest and direct thought and feeling, and with an attention to the present moment. As we teach and care and parent them, we have much to learn from them — to learn together.

How do we encourage emotional intelligence in young children? How do we empower kids to cope with and carry feelings in healthy ways?

1. Remember, Feelings Begin Physically

Tantrums, stomping, frowning, fist-clenching. Identifying feelings is a challenge for all of us — grown-up or not. Young children may only know how to verbally express happy, sad, and mad. While still learning ways to channel and show these feelings, they will express themselves physically. We can help children to identify the clues their bodies/behaviors give them about those unnamed feelings.

2. Encourage, empower, and guide children to name their own feelings

Ask open-ended, exploratory questions. Try to veer away from questions with yes/no answers. Example: How are you feeling? What happened to make you feel this way? What can we do to calm you down or cheer you up?

3. Affirm that feelings are legitimate

Feeling sad, tired, grumpy, nervous, excited — these feelings are real and often important. Let children know that this is normal and okay, that adults feel these too. Share your experiences and strategies with children. When you’re feeling a certain way, how do you cope? We may not choose our feelings, but we can choose how to express them. My parents’ repeated advice was this: “you may be feeling this way, but you don’t need to act this way” (this was usually tired and grumpy, they were referring to).

4. Allow space

Children need access to the outdoors to experience the quiet, beauty, and wonder of nature. Feelings need room to spread out.

5. Step back

In the midst of noisy feelings, children and caretakers can benefit from a pause. “Taking five” was a tool I used in the classroom to allow students (often frustrated and unproductive) five minutes to use in their own, quiet way — often with a pile of books. They, and I, often returned to the task more calm and ready.

6. Read illustrated books aloud

This medium offers children language higher than their level of expression — but not their level of understanding. Books give kids a greater ability to hold and communicate feelings.

7. Give feelings feet!

Encourage children to let their feelings move. If they’re happy feelings — or any sort of feeling, really — dance! As an adult, too, I have to remind myself to sometimes leave my brain and heart behind. Take a walk, write in a journal, create art, play. Move!

8. Help children to recognize that feelings are temporary

A wise friend of mine says you feel feelings — but you aren’t your feelings. Imagine them like visitors. How can we take care of them while they’re here? What can we learn from them? They’ll show themselves out, when they’re ready. They’ll come and go again.

9. Teach that caring for ourselves helps us to care for others

Learning to recognize and care for our own emotions is a necessary precursor to practicing compassion. Encouraging children to know and recognize their own feelings will help them to observe the same in others — and to practice compassion.

10. Remind children that feelings are complicated and that it’s okay

Feelings are often more muddled-up than happy, sad, or mad, but that makes it so important to talk through them.

The world of feelings is wonderful and complicated. It’s a world we all carry within us, child and adult alike. Guiding children to carry their emotions in appropriate ways will lead to healthier children and, someday, healthier adults — capable of caring for themselves and for others. Join me in a journey we all take, over and over again, out, out, away from here — through that mountainous terrain of feeling.

(Art by Sang Miao, © Flying Eye Books)

Download your own copy of this poster: low-res, or high-res.

Rachel Woodworth grew up in Canada and graduated from a liberal arts university in the United States. With an ongoing wonder with words and the world, writing has accompanied her for the whole of her travels. Out, Out, Away From Here (published by Flying Eye Books) is Rachel’s first book and is available now. She is currently living in Tanzania.


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Emily Hughes Wins Theodor Seuss Geisel Award

Congratulations to the creator of Wild and The Little Gardener, Emily Hughes, for winning the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award from the American Library Association. Announced Monday, February 12, Hughes along with writer Laurel Snyder won the award for Charlie & Mouse.

Emily’s lush, playful titles have received rave attention since the beginning.   

The Little Gardener was an NPR Best Book of 2015, and the New York Times praised, “Hughes’s illustrations thrum with life. The drawings are a tangle of Gauguin and Rousseau and botanical journals.”

As for Wild, the story of a little girl who simply won’t be tamed, Maria Popova of Brain Pickings said it was “an irreverent, charming, and oh-so-delightfully illustrated story, partway between Kipling’s The Jungle Book and Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are . . . Wild is one of the loveliest and most endearing picture-books I’ve seen.”

These stunning titles are available for purchase anywhere books are sold or on the Nobrow website. We wish Emily Hughes all the best in this prestigious win.


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Find Nobrow/Flying Eye Books at ABA’s Winter Institute and ALA Midwinter

Memphis and Denver, Nobrow is coming for you!

We’ll be at the American Booksellers Association’s Winter Institute (running January 22 to 25) in Memphis, Tennessee. Say hello to US Sales and Marketing Associate Director, Hannah Moushabeck on Meet the Presses Day: January 25, 9:15am to 12pm; 1:30pm to 7pm. Booksellers will have the opportunity to meet with Hannah for an informal conversation, and pick up an advance copy of Professor Astro Cat’s Human Body Odyssey (forthcoming in March).

Then, running from February 9 to 12, Nobrow will be in Denver, Colorado for the American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting. Come say hello to us at Booth #1111 in the Exhibit Hall at the Colorado Convention Center! Pick up a poster, buttons, and enter our raffle for a chance to win our full Hilda series and a Hilda doll.

We hope to catch you at one of these events. You won’t want to miss this chance at an early sneak peek of our Spring 2018 list of children’s books and graphic novels!